Items filtered by date: Monday, 23 September 2019

Iranian authorities on Monday announced that Iran’s government has freed the British-flagged oil tanker Stena Impero, which was seized in the Strait of Hormuz in mid-July.

The announcement comes more than a month after British authorities released an Iranian tanker that had been detained off Gibraltar. Iran has been in an escalating cycle of confrontation with its Persian Gulf neighbors and the United States.

Government spokesman Ali Rabiei said legal investigations have concluded and the ship’s violations have been forgiven, according to Iran’s Fars news agency. However, he did not say if the ship had left port.

The ship was impounded by Iran’s Revolutionary Guard on July 19 for alleged violations. The seizure in the strategically important shipping route in the Gulf has caused tensions between Iran and other countries in the region, as well as with Britain and the U.S.

Erik Hanell, head of Sweden-based shipping company Stena Bulk, which operates the tanker, was not immediately available for comment. Hanell on Sunday told Swedish public broadcaster SVT that the ship’s release appeared imminent.

Published in Travel & Tourism
Taiwan on Monday said it was set to purchase upgraded self-propelled artillery from the U.S., the Island’s Defence Minister Yen De-fa confirmed during questions from lawmakers.
 
If Washington agrees, the proposed procurement of upgraded M109A6 Paladin self-propelled howitzer guns would further bolster the self-governed island state’s coastal defence capability. However, the country had already purchased M1A2 Abrams battle tanks from the U.S.
 
Taiwan’s Chief of Army Staff (COAS), Yang Hai-ming, told DPA that the upgraded artillery was needed to meet his country’s defense needs and to assist in digitising its armed forces.
 
The governing Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) lawmaker, Lin Ching-Yi cited a perceived threat from China as a reason for Taiwan to continue to ramp up its defense capabilities.
 
Taiwan has had a separate government to China since 1949, but Beijing still sees the island country as part of its territory and discourages other nations from formally recognising Taiwan as its own country.
 
Published in Business
The UN Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres, on Monday announced the formation of a constitutional committee for Syria, to help move ahead a peace process and resolve political disputes.
 
The formation of the committee came after nearly eight years of war in the country. The launch of a process for a new constitution and the formation of a 150-member committee started at a conference in Russia on January 2018. Agreeing on the full list of members has taken more than 18 months. The process will be run out of Geneva.
 
“I strongly believe that the launch of the Syrian-owned and Syrian-led constitutional committee can, and must, be the beginning of the political path out of the tragedy,” Guterres said in New York.
 
The UN chief noted that the committee was backed by Russia, Turkey, and Iran, the main countries involved in the Syrian peace process.
 
A UN-led roadmap for a peace plan was first launched in 2012, a year after the start of the Syrian uprising against President Bashar al-Assad.
 
The Syrian government, backed by Russia and Iran, has largely regained control over most of the country, though rebels, including hardline Islamist factions, still control the northern province of Idlib on the border with Turkey.
 
Kurdish factions and the U.S. control the north-east, having seized that territory from the Islamic State as they defeated the extremist group.
 
Published in World
Members of Britain’s Labour Party voted against deciding to immediately campaign to stay in the European Union, a boost to leader Jeremy Corbyn who wants to first secure a national election and then determine Labour’s stance.
 
In a show of hands, members at the party’s annual conference voted against a motion brought by EU supporters to force the party to adopt a so-called “remain” position now before an election and possible second referendum.
 
Corbyn has been under pressure to back staying in the EU, but the Labour leader has argued it is more important to unite a party split over Brexit before deciding which way to campaign – either to leave with a deal or to remain in the bloc.
 
Published in World

From the Africa Hotel Investment Forum in Addis, Marriott International reinforced its commitment to Africa by announcing it expects to add 40 properties and over 8,000 rooms across the continent by the end of 2023.

The company also announced signed agreements to open its first property in Cape Verde and further expand its presence in Ethiopia, Kenya and Nigeria. Marriott’s development pipeline through 2023 is estimated to drive investment of over $2 billion from property owners and is expected to generate over 12,000 new jobs in Africa.

Marriott International’s current portfolio in Africa encompasses close to 140 properties with more than 24,000 rooms across 14 brands and 20 countries and territories.

“Africa is a land of opportunity with untapped potential and remains core to our strategy,” said Alex Kyriakidis, President and Managing Director, Middle East & Africa, Marriott International. “The economic growth the region is witnessing, along with the substantial emphasis countries across the continent are placing on the travel and tourism sector, present us with immense opportunities for growth.”

Key markets fuelling Marriott’s growth in Africa include Morocco, South Africa, Algeria and Egypt.

Published in Travel & Tourism

Ghana has a rich folkloric tradition that includes Adinkra symbols, Kente cloth, traditional festivals, music and storytelling. Perhaps one of Ghana’s best known folk characters is Ananse, the spider god and trickster, after whom the Ghanaian storytelling tradition Anansesem is named.

Ghana also has some of the world’s most restrictive laws on the use of its folklore. The country’s 2005 Copyright Act defines folklore as “the literary, artistic and scientific expressions belonging to the cultural heritage of Ghana which are created, preserved and developed by ethnic communities of Ghana or by an unidentified Ghanaian author”.

This suggests that the legislation, which is an update of a 1985 law, applies equally to traditional works where the author is unknown and new works derived from folklore where the author is known.

The rights in these works are “vested in the President on behalf of and in trust for the people of the republic”. These rights are also deemed to exist in perpetuity. This means that works which qualify as folkloric will never fall into the public domain – and will never be free to use.

The 1985 Act only restricted use of Ghana’s folklore by foreigners. The 2005 Act extended this to Ghanaian nationals. In principle, this means that a Ghanaian artist wishing to use Ananse stories, or a musician who wants to rework old folk songs or musical rhythms must first seek approval from the National Folklore Board and pay an undisclosed fee.

This is deeply problematic. Following independence in 1957, many artists have explicitly and habitually drawn on Ghana’s folk traditions to develop today’s creative industries. The 2005 Act means that the current generation of cultural practitioners must either seek permission to use and rework their cultural heritage, or look elsewhere for inspiration.

There is clearly a balance to be struck between safeguarding and access when it comes to the protection of a state’s cultural heritage. However, it is important to acknowledge that while Ghana’s legislation appears to tip towards protection at the expense of access, it restricts growth in the creative industries by discouraging artists from engaging with their national cultural heritage.

History of protection

Ethnomusicologist and musician John Collins has noted that the development of the 2005 Act was partly in response to US singer Paul Simon’s use of a melody taken from the song ‘Yaa Amponsah’ for his 1990 album 'The Rhythm of the Saints’.

Simon attributed this melody to the Ghanaian musician Jacob Sam and his band the Kumasi Trio. But on further investigation the Ghanaian government asserted that the melody was a work of folklore and so, belonged to the state.

From this, two things are clear. Firstly, in Ghana folklore belongs to the state and not the originating communities that predate the modern state. Secondly, Jacob Sam received no recompense for Simon’s use of the work, with all royalties owed on the work flowing back the government.

There are a number of issues here that set Ghana apart from other African states.

Many states allow for the use of folklore by nationals and if a fee is applicable then it is paid as a royalty based on revenue raised. This is the case in all three states bordering Ghana: Togo, Burkina Faso and Cote d’Ivoire. Consequently, if an artist in one of these countries reworks folklore but makes no money, then no money is paid for that use. If the work becomes successful then the artist and the rights holder benefit.

However, in Ghana, the law states that payment is paid prior to use and so prior to any profits made. This potentially adds to the cost of production and so discourages use of folklore.

The other issue here is who owns the rights in national heritage. In many countries, such as Kenya, the originating communities retain the rights to their expressions of cultural heritage.

However, in Ghana the rights are vested in the office of the president. This means that any moral or financial benefit that results from uses of folklore flow to the office of the president, rather than being used to support continued safeguarding and growth of cultural heritage within communities.

Guarding against exploitation

Though Ghana’s present regime may appear draconian, there are compelling reasons why such protective measures are required.

Firstly, Ghana’s cultural heritage – its traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions – have been and continue to be exploited by non-Ghanaians in international markets with no beneficial interest flowing either to the state or to the originating community.

To give this some context, Simon’s use of Yaa Amponsah was only one use of Ghana’s cultural heritage in the developing of a new, and commercially successful, work. More recently, there were a number of press reports in Ghana that the Ghana Folklore Board intended to sue the producers of Marvel’s Black Panther for the unauthorised use of kente cloth in some of the characters’ costumes.

The Folklore Board clarified these reports in a press release, saying it did not intend to sue – but rather, wished to discuss attribution. Kente is specifically named as an object of protection under the 2005 Act and the current proliferation of unauthorised cheap kente designs entering global markets from China presents a significant challenge. Attribution, in this case, would ensure that cinema goers across the world would associate kente with Ghana, bringing a traditional craft to a global audience.

The board faces a particularly complex challenge. It must balance safeguarding traditional heritage with allowing creative artists room to reuse and rework elements of that heritage in a way that does not add to the cost or complexity of production.

Though the threat of unfair exploitation is real, equally real is the potential threat to the creative industries and the future development of Ghana’s living heritage if the country’s artists move away from their cultural heritage.The Conversation

 

Stephen Collins, Lecturer, University of the West of Scotland

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Published in Business
Monday, 23 September 2019 05:37

Zimbabwe Delayed Land Reform for South Africa

Former South African President Thabo Mbeki has said former President Robert Mugabe delayed embarking on the land reform programme to allow successful negotiations between the African National Congress (ANC) and the apartheid regime.

He said this at Durban City Hall on Tuesday during an ANC memorial service for Cde Mugabe in KwaZulu-Natal.

"As we began the process of negotiations here in South Africa in 1990, the 10-year period of the Constitution of Zimbabwe negotiated at the Lancaster House came to an end," said Cde Mbeki.

"Zimbabwe could now redo its Constitution, including addressing this matter of the land question, particularly as it related to the principle of willing buyer-willing seller.

"The then secretary-general of the Commonwealth, Chief Emeka Anyaoku from Nigeria, then approached President Mugabe to plead with him not to change the Lancaster House provisions related to the land question.

"His (Chief Anyaoku) argument was that if Zimbabwe did something like that to address the land issue, correctly as they needed to address it, it would frighten the white population in South Africa and make it difficult for ANC to negotiate with them."

Cde Mbeki said Cde Mugabe then acceded to Chief Anyaoku's plea.

"That is why the land reform process was delayed in Zimbabwe for at least a decade," he said.

"It was done in order to give us a space here in order to succeed in our negotiations with the apartheid regime."

Cde Mbeki said he went to the UK and spoke to Prime Minister Tony Blair and urged the British government to honour its Lancaster House agreement.

"As South African government we told Prime Minister Blair that we think you must honour your promise on the land question that particular year UK, Canada and Australia and New Zealand, the so called white Commonwealth, all of them for some reasons had budget surpluses and so we said to him (Prime Minister Blair) that if he committed himself to raising the money, we will talk to other Commonwealth countries to support him and he agreed," he said.

"A donor conference was held in Zimbabwe in 1998 to address this matter and it was agreed, but dishonoured in the first instance by the UK.

"The matter came up again a bit later when the war veterans started occupying some of the farms and at that particular time there were 115 farms that were available for sale and they would have cost 9 million.

"Zimbabwe sent a delegation to the UK to ask that they be given the money to buy those farms to take the war veterans onto these farms that would have owned away from these commercial ones and the British government said they had no money."

 

Credit: The Herald

Published in Economy
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