Items filtered by date: Thursday, 09 May 2019

President Hage Geingob lashed out at Air Namibia's poor service, saying it is failing the nation.

Geingob, who is hosting his counterpart from Guinea, President Alpha Condé, said this in response to question on possible cooperation between the national airlines of two countries. Ministers from Conde's delegation missed their flight from Lagos when Air Namibia cancelled the direct flight.

The ministers had to sign bilateral agreements with Namibia. President Geingob said he would not agree to cooperation between the airlines unless Air Namibia improves service.

"I'm not going to agree because it would mean I'm agreeing to incompetence" he said.

 

Source: Namibian Broadcasting Corporation

Published in Travel & Tourism

Minister of Transportation, Rotimi Amaechi, has said that about $45 billion is needed to complete rail development in the country.

Amaechi, made this disclosure on Tuesday in Abuja, while also revealing that the federal government approved about $3.9 billion for the construction of Warri seaport and also awarded contract for Abuja-Warri rail line. 

“The President awarded the contract for Abuja to Warri, Abuja to Itakpe, then to Warri. From Warri rail to the seaport. We are building a new seaport in Warri, the cabinet approved it last week, that is about 3.9 billion dollars,” he said.

According to him, soon as the Lagos-Kano, Port Harcourt-Maduguri, Lagos-Calabar and Abuja-Warri rail lines were constructed, the rail would have covered the country.

The minister also noted that the government has not spent over $3 billion so far on all the ongoing projects.

“The Lagos-Ibadan will cost about 1.6 billion dollars, that doesn’t include the extra cost of things we didn’t prepare for or see in the evaluation; Abuja-Kaduna was constructed with about a billion dollars.

“We also paid 500 million dollars to buy locomotives and rolling stocks for Lagos-Ibadan, I can’t remember how much we spent buying rolling stocks for Kaduna-Abuja, that is what we have spent so far.

“So all the noise that you hear people saying we have spent 8 point something billion dollars is not true. I don’t think we have spent up to three billion dollars so far. Railway is capital intensive, a trillion naira is about 2.7 billion dollars.

“And that is for 200km of railway, if you plan to do Lagos-Ibadan and you are looking at 8.7billion dollars that is between 3 and 4 trillion Naira. That is why I said we will need about 35 to 45 billion dollars.

“To be able to do Lagos-Kano, Port harcourt-Maduguri, Lagos-Calabar and Abuja-Warri, once we do this four tracks, we have covered the country and we have solved the problems of transportation to a great extent.”

Published in Engineering

At 1pm on Thursday May 9, South Africa's Electoral Commission results were showing the African National Congress in the lead.

The country voted in national and provincial elections on May 8.

Results for the three main political parties were as follows:


ANC - 3 172 788 votes, or 56.14%
Democratic Alliance - 1 373 246 or 24.30%
Economic Freedom Fighters - 514115 or 9.10%

While results in Gauteng's three major metros are yet to be tallied, the ANC remains confident that it will hang onto the province.

"It's still early days in Gauteng, as none of the metros have been counted yet. We are still waiting for Johannesburg, Tshwane and Ekurhuleni where most of the voters live, and their decision will decide where this province goes," DA head of statistics in Gauteng, Ashor Sarupen, told News24 at the Gauteng results centre in Auckland Park, Johannesburg, on Thursday.

 

Credit: News24

Published in Economy

The Minister of Transportation, Mr Rotimi Amaechi, said the federal government has approved the construction for Warri seaport at the cost of about 3.9 billion dollars and also awarded the contract for Abuja-Warri rail line.

Amaechi on Tuesday in Abuja that government also approved the linking of Abuja to Itakpe, Itakpe-Warri, then from Warri rail to the seaport.

“The President awarded the contract for Abuja to Warri, Abuja to Itakpe, then to Warri. From Warri rail to the seaport. We are building a new seaport in Warri, the cabinet approved it last week, that is about 3.9 billion dollars,” he said.

He, however, said that about 45 billion dollars was needed to complete rail development in the country.

He said that once Lagos-Kano, Port Harcourt-Maiduguri, Lagos-Calabar and Abuja-Warri rail lines were constructed, the rail would have covered the country.

According to him, the government has not spent over 3 billion dollars so far on all the ongoing projects.

“The Lagos-Ibadan will cost about 1.6 billion dollars, that doesn’t include the extra cost of things we didn’t prepare for or see in the evaluation; Abuja-Kaduna was constructed with about a billion dollars.

“We also paid 500 million dollars to buy locomotives and rolling stocks for Lagos-Ibadan, I can’t remember how much we spent buying rolling stocks for Kaduna-Abuja, that is what we have spent so far.

“So all the noise that you hear people saying we have spent 8 points something billion dollars is not true. I don’t think we have spent up to three billion dollars so far. Railway is capital intensive, a trillion naira is about 2.7 billion dollars.

“And that is for 200km of railway if you plan to do Lagos-Ibadan and you are looking at 8.7billion dollars that is between 3 and 4 trillion Naira. That is why I said we will need about 35 to 45 billion dollars.

“To be able to do Lagos-Kano, Port Harcourt-Maiduguri, Lagos-Calabar and Abuja-Warri, once we do this four tracks, we have covered the country and we have solved the problems of transportation to a great extent.”

Published in Engineering
Thursday, 09 May 2019 08:48

10% of Tanzanians are obese

Tanzania’s deputy health minister on Tuesday described obesity as one of the leading health concerns in the east African nation.

Faustine Ndugulile told parliament that over 10 per cent of Tanzanians are suffering from obesity.

“With the prevalence of non-communicable diseases increasing at alarming rates in the country, obesity is one of the major health concerns among locals that pose serious challenges,’’ he told the House in the capital, Dodoma.

Ndugulile said the prevalence of obesity is higher among urban residents compared to their rural counterparts.

He was responding to a question by Special Seats Member of Parliament Zainabu Mwamwindi, who suggested the need to empower nutrition officers at ward levels amid growing malnutrition in the country.

“Malnutrition is a big problem among children in the country,’’ Mwamwindi said.

Ndugulile said the government has started implementing a World Health Organisation plan to eradicate malnutrition by 2025.

Published in World

Scientists from China and Kenya on Tuesday pledged to establish a platform for sharing knowledge and expertise to boost the war against infectious diseases.

The scientists, who spoke at an inaugural Sino-Kenyan symposium on infectious diseases, said joint research, training and technology transfer is key to enhancing prevention and management of ailments caused by pathogens.

“We look forward to a strategic partnership with Kenyan scientists who are conducting research on emerging infectious diseases,’’ Shi Yi, professor at Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Microbiology, told Xinhua on the sidelines of the symposium.

“This collaboration will enable us to share knowledge and expertise needed to fight infectious diseases like malaria, Ebola, HIV/AIDS and Marburg virus,’’ he added.

Over 40 Chinese and Kenyan scientists are attending the three-day symposium hosted by Sino-Africa Joint Research Centre (SAJOREC).

Shi said the forum is a key component of science and technology partnership to enhance the fight against infectious diseases among countries participating in the Belt and Road Initiative.

He said that Chinese scientists are keen to learn from their Kenyan counterparts effective strategies that can be adopted to eradicate infectious diseases that have worsened against a backdrop of climate change, habitat destruction and unregulated migration.

“The symposium marked the beginning of a journey of sharing knowledge and best practices between Chinese and Kenyan scientists working in the field of infectious diseases,’’ said Shi.

He said that collaborative research and technology transfer around infectious diseases is a key component of the Belt and Road Initiative.

Juliette Ongus, an associate professor at Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT), that host the SAJOREC, said Kenya should leverage on cooperation with China in biomedical research to help reduce the burden of infectious diseases.

“Our collaboration with China is crucial to strengthen interventions required to eliminate infectious diseases.

“These interventions should focus on research, training alongside diagnosis and treatment of these diseases,” Ongus said

Published in World

Kenyan Deputy President William Ruto on Wednesday said that climate change was to blame for shrinking water resources in the country.

Ruto made the statement while opening the annual Water Service Providers Association (WASPA) conference in Nairobi.

“Climate change is causing poor and delayed rainfall that in the end result to poor harvests and food insecurity,” said Ruto.

He said that depressed rains impacted negatively on critical sectors of the economy while escalating inflationary pressures on citizens.

“The perennial cycles of droughts, floods, drying of rivers, wells, springs and the lowering of the water table are attributed to the twin effects of climate change and destruction of forests,” said Ruto.

He said that reversing the gloomy scenario required robust interventions like expanding the forest cover and better natural resources management.

Ruto urged state officials to act on destruction of catchments and pollution of fresh water bodies.

“You must take stern action against people found directing sewerage waste into streams, rivers and lakes in the country,” he said.

Forests account for about four per cent of Kenya’s Gross Domestic Product and much of the water for domestic and industrial use comes from the country’s five water towers.

Simon Chelugui, Cabinet Secretary for Water and Irrigation, said the government had recognised water as a key factor underlying the success or failure of sustainable development and security in the country.

He urged concerted efforts to promote water harvesting and storage amid recurrent dry spells.
Chelugui said the government would construct large dams to enhance water security for domestic, industrial and agriculture needs.

Published in World
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