Items filtered by date: Sunday, 07 April 2019

An elephant has killed a suspected poacher and lions have eaten his remains, with a human skull and a pair of pants all that authorities have been able to recover.

The man and his accomplices entered South Africa's Kruger National Park in order to poach rhinos on April 2, according to South African National Parks.

The family of the man, who is believed to have been trampled to death, contacted rangers who arranged an aerial and foot search the following day and arrested his four accomplices.

However, due to failing light, they were unable to locate the man's body, and with "further information" provided by the suspected poachers, the search continued into Thursday.

"During this search … the remains of a body were discovered," South African National Parks said in a statement.

"Indications found at the scene suggested that a pride of lions had devoured the remains, leaving only a human skull and a pair of pants."

The Kruger National Park, one of Africa's largest game reserves, is renowned for its high density of wild animals, including lions, leopards, rhinos and elephants.

Park managing executive Glenn Phillips warned people against entering the reserve on foot, saying "it holds many dangers and this incident is evidence of that".

"It is very sad to see the daughters of the [deceased] mourning the loss of their father and, worse still, only being able to recover very little of his remains," he said in a statement.

It is not the first time a suspected poacher has fallen victim to their prey in the Kruger National Park.

Last year lions killed and devoured a man believed to have been poaching animals in the park, leaving behind only "his head and some remains".

Elephants in the reserve have also been known to react violently to the presence of humans.

In 2014, footage emerged of an elephant overturning a car, seriously injuring a woman when one of its tusks ripped open her thigh.

The elephant was later put down and was discovered to have been in musth, a condition that usually affects male elephants once a year when testosterone levels, aggression and sexual activity increase.

 

Credit: ABC News

Published in Travel & Tourism

A group of unemployed men attacked Malawian migrants living in the South African city of Durban at the end of March.

It followed a recent spate of other incidents in the city during the month, prompting leaders from the three main parties to condemn attacks on foreign nationals.

The upsurge in violence has become a charged issue in the campaign ahead of national elections in May.

So how common are attacks against migrants and are they on the rise?

Attacks against foreigners

The South African government does not collect data on attacks or threats against foreign nationals.

However, the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS) has monitored these attacks across South Africa since 1994. Its Xenowatch tracker collates media reports as well as information from activists, victims and observers.

Xenophobic Stats SA

It suggests violent attacks peaked in 2008 and again in 2015.

In 2008, there was a wave of attacks across the country against refugees and migrants - more than 60 people were reported to have been killed and thousands displaced.

Xenophobic attacks spark South African response

In 2015, there were outbreaks of violence against non-South Africans, mostly in the cities of Durban and Johannesburg, which led to the deployment of the army to deter further unrest.

In March, the government launched an initiative to raise public awareness and improve access to services for victims of discrimination.

Human rights groups welcomed it, but said that the government needed to publicly recognise attacks on foreigners as xenophobic.

In a statement published in October, South Africa's main opposition party, the Democratic Alliance, blamed the governing ANC party for a "scourge of xenophobic violence".

Where are the migrants from?

About 70% of foreigners in South Africa come from neighbouring Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Lesotho.

The remaining 30% is made up of people from Malawi, UK, Namibia, eSwatini, previously known as Swaziland, India and other countries.

There are an estimated 3.6 million migrants in the country, a spokesperson for South Africa's national statistics body told the BBC, out of an overall population of well over 50 million.

How do different regions compare?
Gauteng province, which includes South Africa's largest city Johannesburg and the capital Pretoria, has the highest rate of violence against foreign nationals, followed by the Western Cape, according to the ACMS. KwaZulu-Natal, where Durban is situated, is third.

Attacks have mainly taken place in large cities, but they have also been reported in smaller towns and rural areas.

The violence is often triggered by local disputes, with migrants being accused of taking jobs away from South Africans.

Foreign-run shops have been looted and destroyed.

South Africa attacks

Xenophobic violence incidents by Province, 1994-2018 
Gauteng 212
Western Cape 111
KwaZulu-Natal 67
Limpopo 40
Eastern Cape 33
Mpumalanga 22
North West 20
Free State 19
Northern Cape 5
Source: Xenowatch, African Centre for Migration & Society
 

The country has experienced poor economic performance, with officially recorded unemployment at more than 27% at the end of last year.

And more widely, the country has one of the highest murder rates in the world.

"The causes are poverty and has its roots in apartheid," says Sharon Ekambaram, who runs the refugee and migrant rights programme for Lawyers for Human Rights.

 

Source: BBC

Published in Economy

Aliko Dangote, Africa’s richest man, says he withdrew $10 million just to look at it and convince himself that he is rich.

Speaking at the Mo Ibrahim governance weekend ongoing in Abidjan, Dangote said he knew he was rich on paper, but had to find out to convince himself that he was indeed rich.

To do this, the multi-billionaire said he drove to a bank, withdrew $10 million, took it home, put it on his bed, looked at it, and returned it back to the bank the following day.

“The way it is that when you first start business, your target is to make your first million. Fine, I did that,” Dangote told Mo Ibrahim.

“After a year or so, I realised that I had much more, and I said ok, fine, all these numbers are just written numbers.

“One day I went to a bank, and at that time, there were no restrictions, and I wrote a cheque and cashed $10m from the bank and put it in the boot of my vehicle, and I went home and I opened it and I looked at $10m and I said ‘now I believe I have money’.”

Dangote added that he took it back to the bank the next day — after his mission was concluded. The Nigerian businessman is has been the richest man in Africa for nearly a decade, following the expansion of his cement business, and the change of model to focus on local manufacturing.

According to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, Dangote is the 74th richest man in the world as of April 6, and he is valued at $16.4 billion.

Published in Business

An Abuja High Court has nullified the sale of Etisalat Nigeria, which is now 9mobile, to Teleology Nigeria Limited.

Justice Binta Nyako, in her judgment, invalidated all moves taken with respect to the exchange of ownership of Etisalat.

According to her, any action that had been taken concerning the rest of this litigation from the 25th day of April, which was earlier in time, should revert to the position, as of the rest, to its 25th day of April 2018.

The ruling, dated April 1, 2019, was in a suit marked: FHC/ABJ/CS/288/2018 filed on April 6, 2018, by Afdin Ventures Limited and Dirbia Nigeria Limited, the two major investors in Etisalat.

The two major investors — with investments estimated at $43,033,950 — had sued Etisalat to retrieve their investments following their exclusion from the decision-making process of the firm.

According to The Nation, the plaintiffs had said they met the court to void the sale of Etisalat, upon learning that the defendants have proceeded to conclude the transfer of the company’s ownership despite earlier restraining orders.

“In 2009, the plaintiffs/applicants purchased a total of 4,303,391 class “A” shares from the 1st, 2nd and 5th defendants (Karlingtton, Premium Telecommunication and Etisalat International) at the rate of $43,033,950 only, and were issued with share certificates,” they said in a supporting affidavit to the motion dated November 16, 2018.

“In 2010, the defendants rebranded Etisalat Nigeria Limited to 9mobile and entered into negotiations with Smile.com and Glo Network to transfer its licence without recourse to the plaintiffs.

“When the plaintiffs became aware of the purported transaction, they filed this suit along with two applications namely: motion ex-parte and motion on notice, seeking for an order of injunction to restrain the defendants from going ahead with the transaction.

“When this suit came up for hearing on the 17th of April, 2018, this honourable court ordered parties to maintain status quo-pending the determination of the motion on notice.”

Defendants in the suit are: Karington Telecommunication Ltd, Premium Telecommunications Holdings NV, First Bank of Nigeria Plc, Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN), Etisalat International Nigeria Ltd and Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC).

Teleology formally took over the management of 9mobile following the issuance of the final approval of no objection by the board of the NCC on November 12, 2018.

Published in Telecoms
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