Items filtered by date: Friday, 21 September 2018
Prices for the new Apple iPhone Xs will start at R22,000 in South Africa – R5,000 more than its main competitor, the Samsung Note 9 – iStore revealed on Thursday.
 
The new line of Apple phones will officially be available in the country from September 28. 
 
The new iPhone Xs, with improved battery life, and water resistance, will cost R22,000 for the 64GB version, R25,000 for the 256GB version, and R30,000 for the 512GB version. 
 
See also: This is officially what the new Apple Watch will cost in South Africa
The new prices are R1,500 more than the starting prices of the previous iPhone X in South Africa a year ago.
 
In the US, the iPhone Xs 64GB retails for $999 – which is around R14,400 at today’s currency rates. This means the same phone costs R7,600 more in South Africa than in the US, not a great deal more than a return flight to New York.
 
Prices for the larger iPhone Xs Max, with a 16.5cm screen, start at R24,000 for the 64GB version, R27,000 for the 256GB version, and top out at a whopping R32,000 for the 512GB version. 
 
Prices for the cheaper iPhone XR, expected in South Africa on October 26, have not yet been released. 
 
Both the iPhone Xs and Xs Max can be pre-ordered by directly visiting iStore South Africa’s website from September 21. 
 
It can also be bought on FNB credit cards starting from R689 per month for iPhone Xs 64GB, and R755 for the iPhone Xs Max. The iPhone Xs 256GB version is available for R785 per month, and the Xs 256GB R849. 
 
At the launch of the iPhone XS alongside the new Apple Watch at Apple’s headquarters in California on September 12, Apple’s chief design officer Jony Ive said the new phones are the company's “uncompromised vision for the future.”
 
He said the phones’ screens offer better colour precision, a faster camera with 4K abilities, and a more accurate Facial ID to unlock the phone. 
 
 
Business Insider...
Published in Telecoms
President Donald Trump's obsession with building walls has apparently gone global. 
 
Trump recently suggested to the Spanish government it should build a wall in the Sahara desert to address the migration crisis, according to Spain's foreign minister Josep Borrell. 
 
Spain has experienced a surge in migration, particularly over the past year as thousands of people attempt to make the dangerous journey across the Mediterranean in search of a better life in Europe. 
 
The European country has seen over 30,000 migrants and refugees arrive by sea so far in 2018, making Spain the top destination for migrants arriving via the Mediterranean. Moroccans represent the largest single nationality arriving in Spain, but people are coming from other countries in Africa as well.
 
Nearly 2,000 people have died attempting to make the journey across the sea to Europe in 2018 so far. 
 
Trump famously called for a wall to be built along the US-Mexico border to stop illegal immigration to the US during his 2016 presidential campaign, and now apparently feels it can help Europe as well. 
 
When Spanish diplomats told Trump building a wall across the Sahara desert would be no easy feat the president said, "The Sahara border can’t be bigger than our border with Mexico," according to Borrell. 
 
The Sahara desert is roughly 5,000km long. Comparatively, the US-Mexico border spans roughly 3,200km. 
 
Beyond the sheer size of the Sahara, the other challenge to building such a wall is the fact Spain would need permission to do so from the African countries the massive desert stretches across. 
 
Borrell spoke of Trump's Sahara wall suggestion at a lunch in Madrid this week, but did not clarify when the president made these remarks. But The Guardian reports it could've been when the Spanish foreign minister accompanied King Felipe and Queen Letizia to the White House in June.
 
When asked for more details on Borrell's comments, a spokesperson for the foreign ministry told The Guardian, "We can confirm that’s what the minister said, but we won’t be making any further comment on the minister’s remarks."
 
It seems Trump struggles to avoid discussing his desired border wall in almost any context, and on Tuesday said a recent visit to a 9/11 memorial in Pennsylvania gave him more inspiration for his vision. 
 
"They built this gorgeous wall where the plane went down in Pennsylvania. Shanksville. And I was there. I made the speech. And it’s sort of beautiful, what they did is incredible," Trump told Hill.TV in an interview on Tuesday. "They have a series of walls, I’m saying, 'It’s like perfect.' So, so, we are pushing very hard."
 
Trump's plan for a border wall along the US-Mexico border has encountered many obstacles in US Congress. The president has repeatedly claimed that construction on the wall is underway, but this is inaccurate. 
 
 
Tribune...
Published in Travel & Tourism

I think about the future of my continent in terms of three questions: Are Africans healthy? Do they have access to a good education? And do they have opportunities to apply their skills?

Millions more Africans have been able to answer yes to these questions in recent years. But there’s an elephant in the room. One of the keys to keeping this progress going is slowing down the rapid rates of population growth in parts of the continent. But population issues are so difficult to talk about that the development community has been ignoring them for years.

Population growth is a controversial topic because, in the not-too-distant past, some countries tried to control population growth with abusive, coercive policies, including forced sterilization. Now, human rights are again at the centre of the discussion about family planning, where they belong. But as part of repairing the wounds created by this history, population was removed from the development vocabulary altogether.

For the sake of Africa’s future, we should bring it back. Based on current trends, Africa as a whole is projected to double in size by 2050. Between 2050 and 2100, according to the United Nations, it could almost double again. In that case, the continent would have to quadruple its efforts just to maintain the current level of investment in health and education, which is too low already.

But if the rate of population growth slows down there will be more resources to invest in each African’s health, education, and opportunity – in other words, in a good life.

To be very clear: the goal of family planning programmes is not to hit population targets; on the contrary, it’s to empower women so that they can exercise their fundamental right to choose the number of children they will have, when, and with whom. Fortunately, empowering couples to make decisions about their lives also improves Africa’s future by changing the population growth scenario across the continent.

Scenarios

Some relatively simple future scenarios for sub-Saharan Africa have been modelled to consider how various family planning-related investments might affect population growth. These have been built using data from the Track20 Project. The project monitors global progress in extending access to modern contraceptives to additional 120 million women in the world’s 69 poorest countries by 2020.

Let’s examine the data.

How different investments in family planning may affect the African population. 2018 Goalkeepers data report

Wanted fertility: the black line represents sub-Saharan Africa’s population to 2100 based on estimates by the United Nations Population Division. The blue line represents its population to 2100 if every woman had only the number of children she wanted. Currently, women in the region have an average of 0.7 more children than they want. If that number went down to zero over the next five years, the population in 2100 could change by 30%.

Education: another link between empowerment and population growth is the transformative impact of secondary education for girls. Educated girls tend to work more, earn more, expand their horizons, marry and start having children later, have fewer children, and invest more in each child. Their children, in turn, tend to follow similar patterns, so the effect of graduating one girl sustains itself for generations. Though the impact of education is sweeping, our model looks at just one narrow aspect of it: a shift in the age at which women give birth to their first child.

The pink line represents sub-Saharan Africa’s population if every woman’s first birth were delayed by an average of approximately two years. The average age at first birth for women in Africa is significantly lower than in any other region. Currently, it is 20 or younger in half of African countries. This scenario doesn’t have anything to do with women having fewer children. It just has to do with when they start having them.

Consider this thought experiment. If every woman started having children at age 15, then in 60 years you’d have four generations (60/15=4). But if every woman started having children at age 20, then in 60 years you’d have three generations (60/20=3). Even if those women had the same number of children in each generation, the total population would be one-quarter smaller in the latter scenario. To be conservative, we assumed a less substantial delay in our model. Still, it changes the projected population by nearly 10%.

All well-meaning Africans will support sending girls to school and giving them access to information about family planning and contraceptives when they ask for them.

And I hope we will stop shying away from also pointing out that empowered women make millions of individual decisions that add up to a better demographic situation for themselves, for their children, and for Africa.

 

A version of this article was first published in the Goalkeepers ReportThe Conversation

Alex Ezeh, Dornsife Professor of Global Health, Drexel University

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Published in Opinion & Analysis
South African food hauler AfriAg Global PLC is seeking a licence to grow dagga in the UK.
The company has engaged London office of law firm, Hill Dickinson LLP, to assist with the process.
The company comes from humble beginnings in 2013 when two businessmen began flying fresh African fruit and vegetables to supermarkets in Europe.
SA food hauler AfriAg Global PLC this week announced it is seeking a licence to cultivate and produce dagga in the United Kingdom.
 
The London-listed global food and logistics group announced that it has formally engaged the London office of law firm Hill Dickinson LLP to run the application process to become a licensed cultivator and producer in the UK of medicinal cannabis. 
 
South Africa's highest court on Tuesday allowed the private use of marijuana, upholding a lower court's ruling that found the criminalization of cannabis was unconstitutional.
 
“I have extensive experience in the global legal medical cannabis sector, having assisted with financing medical cannabis operations in Jamaica, Australia, Canada and Europe, and the board see a huge opportunity here for AfriAg Global to help the UK increase its global market presence in this very exciting and fast-growing sector,” said David Lenigas, executive chair of AfriAg Global.
 
The company comes from humble beginnings when two businessmen, Lenigas in London and Paul de Robillard in Johannesburg, began hauling and flying fresh African fruit and vegetables to supermarkets in Europe in 2013.
 
Now they operate one of the largest air carriers of perishable goods from southern Africa to all around the globe.
 
Britain proposed in July to allow doctors to prescribe medicinal cannabis starting this year.  
 
Recreational use of cannabis is still prohibited in the UK, much like in South Africa.
 
 
News24
Published in Business
Friday, 21 September 2018 07:16

Naira Depreciate To N363.27/$ In I&E Window

The Naira, yesterday, depreciated to N363.27 per dollar in the Investors and Exporters (I&E) window even as the volume of dollars traded rose marginally by 257 percent.
 
Data from FMDQ showed that the indicative exchange rate for the window rose to N363.27 per dollar yesterday from N362.97 per dollar on Wednesday, indicating 30 kobo depreciation of the naira.
 
The volume of dollars traded on the window yesterday rose by 257 percent to $401.69 million from $112.66 million traded on Wednesday.
 
However, the naira yesterday was stable at N359 per dollar in the parallel market.
 
 
The Guardian
Published in Bank & Finance
Canopy Rivers, the venture-capital arm of Canopy Growth, made its trading debut on the Toronto Stock Exchange in Canada on Thursday.
 
The company, which makes minority investments in burgeoning dagga companies, in an attempt to become the "Google Ventures of cannabis," found its way onto the exchange via a reverse takeover with a company formerly known as AIM2 Ventures.
 
Canopy Growth will maintain its roughly 25% stake in Canopy Rivers, and controls about 90% of the voting rights thanks to the venture arm's dual-class governance structure. The other three quarters of Rivers' roughly $200 million of investments have come from institutional investors.
 
"In Canopy I don't want to be in the business of growth directly, by trying to make bets on stocks through buying and selling," CEO Bruce Linton told the Canadian program Midas Letter last week. "In Rivers, we want to be in that business. We're not just putting cash into them, we're putting intellectual skills and expertise."
 
So far the firm has made 11 investments in smaller companies. It looks for stellar management teams with a track record of success when making new investments, a Rivers executive recently explained to Business Insider. 
 
Dagga stocks in North America have been on fire this month. Tilray, now the largest producer by market capitalisation, has seen its stock price more than triple, boosted by receiving clearance to export medical marijuana to the United States for a clinical drug trial. Meanwhile, Canopy Growth's market value has doubled over that time following a $4 billion investment from Constellation Brands, the company behind Corona, Modelo, and other popular alcoholic beverages.
 
That global expansion is what Canopy Rivers hopes to tap through its strategic investments and deals.
 
"Canopy Rivers presents a world of opportunity for its partners and for Canopy Growth," CEO Bruce Linton said in a press release.
 
"It’s the type of relationship that allows us to continue to grow our lead in this incredibly dynamic industry … Whether it’s access to new brands, new technologies, differentiated products, first rights to future financing opportunities, and even rights to future full acquisition, Rivers will build value for shareholders, including Canopy Growth by building value for its portfolio partners.
 
 
Business Insider
Published in Agriculture

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