Items filtered by date: Tuesday, 14 November 2017

Port Harcourt International Airport, Omagwa and Murtala Muhammed International Airport (MMIA), Lagos have been rated among the worst 20 airports.

This is outcome of a survey by renowned aviation organization, Sleep in Airport (sleepinginairports.net). The website ranked Lagos the fifth worst airport in the world, while Port Harcourt was ranked the third worst airport globally.

The criteria used included comfort (gate seating and availability of rest zones), services, facilities and things to do, food options, immigration/security, customer service, cleanliness, navigation and ease of transit and sleepability. The website explained that the airports that appeared on the list of worst airports in the world are those that have the capacity to truly offend travellers.

“Within these terminals, there appears to be a general disinterest in a positive traveller experience. In some cases, passengers are made to stand or sit on the floor as they await their flights. In others, the bathrooms don’t have water, toilet paper, or any semblance of cleanliness,” it said.

“In some cases, the physical structure of the airport is fine, but the personnel are the problem. Got a problem? Don’t expect much in terms of customer service at these airports.

“If you find yourself travelling through one of these 20 terminals, brace yourself. You’ll want to give yourself just enough time to get in and get out. A minute more and you’ll be unhappy and uncomfortable – a minute less, and you risk missing your flight”, it added.

Port Harcourt International Airport, Nigeria (PHC)

It doesn't matter what type of VISA you have, they will tell you it's the wrong one and you must pay for the correct one. Inefficiency is rampant with people repeatedly going through your luggage and asking for $ or for you to do something for them. Virtually every person there seeks to extort $ from you. You will hear the phrase "You have something for me?" over and over. - survey respondent

Lagos Murtala Muhammed International Airport, Nigeria (LOS)

Every offical ask you for money. Don't tell them you have cash, otherwise, the customs offical will take you to the dark room. But if you give the money to the Nigerian Offical, you can bring anything on to the plane. - survey respondent

 

In order of ranking, the worst five airports in the world comprised Juba International Airport, South Sudan (JUB), Jeddah King Abdulaziz International Airport, Saudi Arabia (JED), Port Harcourt International Airport, Nigeria (PHC), Crete Heraklion International Airport, Greece (HER) and Lagos Murtala Muhammed International Airport, Nigeria (LOS).

Others are Santorini Thira National Airport, Greece (JTR), Dar es Salaam Julius Nyerere International Airport, Tanzania (DAR), Rhodes International Airport, Greece (RHO), Paris Beauvais-Tille Airport, France (BVA), Tashkent International Airport, Uzbekistan (TAS) and London Luton International Airport, England (LTN).

 

Credit: Daily Post Nigeria & SleepinginAirports

 

Published in Travel & Tourism

The federal government of Nigeria said it has recovered the sum of $64.630, 065 billion from Niger and Benin republic as part payment for electricity supply to the two nieghbouring countries.

Minister of Works, Energy and Housing Babatunde Fashola (SAN) made this known at the 21st monthly power stakeholders meeting in Asaba Monday. 

Addressing heads of DISCOS across the country in the power sector, the minister said generation has hit 7,000mw due to the stable peace in the gas producing area of Niger Delta region. According to the minister, “for the first time in the history of power sector, hydro and gas combined together to improve electricity needs of the country.

“This is a fair balance and now that the waters are going down it is also the time for us to prove our mettle by stabilizing upward, the power being generated. “We have also been able to recover $64.630, 065 billion from Niger and Benin republic as part payment for electricity supply to the two nieghbouring countries,” the minister added.

Speaking further, Fashola tasked Nigerian lawmakers on the need to come up with legislation prohibiting encroachment on the right of way of power lines, vandalization of electricity installations and another that will support collection of bills among others.

The minister appealed to electricity consumers to pay their bills regularly without which DISCOs would find it difficult to provide services, adding that the greatest challenges facing consumers were estimated billings and insufficiency in mater which he said were being addressed by Nigeria Electricity Regulation Commission (NERC).

 

Daily Post Nigeria

Published in Engineering

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